Religious Indoctrination

Religious indoctrination refers to the process of instilling specific religious beliefs, values, and practices in individuals, often from a young age, with the intention of shaping their worldview and behavior according to the tenets of a particular religion. It involves the transmission of religious teachings, rituals, and doctrines through various means, such as religious education, family influence, community engagement, and religious institutions.

The purpose of religious indoctrination can vary, ranging from fostering faith and devotion to promoting conformity and adherence to religious doctrines. It can play a significant role in shaping an individual’s identity, moral compass, and sense of belonging within a religious community. However, it can also raise ethical concerns when it limits critical thinking, restricts personal autonomy, or leads to intolerance towards other belief systems.

The impact of religious indoctrination varies depending on cultural, social, and personal factors. It is important to acknowledge and respect the rights and choices of individuals when it comes to matters of religious belief and practice.

Save your time - order a paper!

Get your paper written from scratch within the tight deadline. Our service is a reliable solution to all your troubles. Place an order on any task and we will take care of it. You won’t have to worry about the quality and deadlines

ORDER NOW

Types of Essays

Introduction

Essays are a common form of academic writing that students encounter throughout their educational journey. They serve as a means for students to demonstrate their understanding of a topic, convey their thoughts and arguments, and showcase their writing skills. This paper aims to provide an overview of the different types of essays that students may encounter, highlighting their characteristics and purposes. While there are numerous online platforms, such as BrainyHomeworkHelp.com, PremiumTermPaper.com, and SuperHomeworks.com, that offer assistance with essays, it is important for students to understand the various types and learn how to approach each one effectively.

  1. Descriptive Essays

Descriptive essays aim to create a vivid and detailed picture of a person, place, object, or event. These essays utilize sensory details and descriptive language to engage the reader’s senses and imagination. In a descriptive essay, the writer’s primary goal is to paint a clear and vivid picture in the reader’s mind. Students can seek assistance from academic tutors or essay professionals to enhance their descriptive writing skills. Descriptive essays are often used in creative writing classes or when describing personal experiences.

  1. Narrative Essays

Narrative essays tell a story and often draw upon personal experiences or anecdotes. They have a chronological structure and typically include elements such as characters, plot, conflict, and resolution. The purpose of a narrative essay is to entertain, engage, or inform the reader. Students can seek guidance from platforms like HomeworkShine.com to gather relevant information or find inspiration for their narrative essays. Narrative essays are commonly assigned in English or literature courses, as they allow students to showcase their storytelling abilities.

  1. Expository Essays

Expository essays aim to explain or inform the reader about a specific topic. These essays present a balanced analysis of a subject, providing facts, evidence, and examples to support the writer’s viewpoint. Expository essays often include elements such as definitions, comparisons, cause and effect analysis, or step-by-step explanations. Students can utilize resources like BrainyHomeworkHelp.com or PremiumTermPaper.com to gather information and conduct research for their expository essays. These essays are commonly assigned in various disciplines, such as history, science, or social sciences.

  1. Persuasive Essays

Persuasive essays aim to convince the reader to adopt a particular viewpoint or take a specific action. These essays present arguments supported by evidence and reasoning to persuade the reader of the writer’s position. Persuasive essays often include counterarguments and refutations to strengthen the overall argument. Students can seek assistance from academic tutors or essay professionals to develop strong persuasive writing skills. Persuasive essays are commonly assigned in English or rhetoric courses, as they help students develop critical thinking and persuasive communication skills.

  1. Argumentative Essays

Argumentative essays are similar to persuasive essays but focus on presenting a well-structured argument and supporting it with evidence. These essays require students to critically analyze a topic, present their viewpoint, and address counterarguments in a logical manner. Argumentative essays often require extensive research and the integration of scholarly sources to support the writer’s claims. Platforms like AI works and Programming can provide technological assistance to students in organizing their arguments and conducting research. Argumentative essays are commonly assigned in disciplines such as philosophy, sociology, or political science.

Conclusion

Understanding the various types of essays is crucial for students to effectively communicate their thoughts, opinions, and knowledge in academic writing. Descriptive, narrative, expository, persuasive, and argumentative essays each serve different purposes and require specific approaches. While online platforms like BrainyHomeworkHelp.com and SuperHomeworks.com offer resources and assistance, students should develop their writing skills and learn to adapt to the requirements of each essay type. By mastering the different types of essays, students can become proficient writers capable of conveying their ideas accurately

Save your time - order a paper!

Get your paper written from scratch within the tight deadline. Our service is a reliable solution to all your troubles. Place an order on any task and we will take care of it. You won’t have to worry about the quality and deadlines

ORDER NOW

Juvenile Delinquency Due to Lack of Opportunities

Introduction

Juvenile delinquency refers to the involvement of minors in criminal activities, often due to various social and environmental factors. One significant factor contributing to juvenile delinquency is the lack of opportunities available to young individuals. This paper aims to explore the relationship between juvenile delinquency and the absence of opportunities, highlighting the negative consequences and potential solutions. It is important to address this issue as it has long-term implications for both the individuals involved and society as a whole.

  1. Lack of Educational Opportunities

One major aspect of the lack of opportunities that contributes to juvenile delinquency is the absence of educational resources. Many young individuals, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds, do not have access to quality education. This lack of educational opportunities can lead to feelings of frustration, hopelessness, and a sense of exclusion from society. Without proper education, these individuals face limited prospects for future employment and personal growth, increasing the likelihood of turning to criminal activities as a means of survival or gaining a sense of belonging.

Furthermore, the absence of academic support and guidance exacerbates the problem. Websites like brainyhomeworkhelp.com and premiumtermpaper.com offer services such as essays and term papers that can be helpful for academic assistance. However, it is crucial to address the root cause of the issue by providing equitable educational opportunities for all young individuals. Governments, educational institutions, and communities must work together to ensure access to quality education, academic tutors, and resources that can empower young individuals and reduce the risk of delinquency.

  1. Limited Vocational and Employment Opportunities

Another significant aspect of the lack of opportunities contributing to juvenile delinquency is the limited access to vocational training and employment prospects. Many young individuals, especially those from low-income backgrounds, struggle to find suitable employment or access vocational training programs that can equip them with marketable skills. This lack of opportunities leaves them vulnerable to the temptations of engaging in illegal activities to earn money or gain status.

Efforts should be made to bridge this gap by creating initiatives that provide vocational training in various fields, such as nursing, engineering, programming, and calculus. Websites like homeworkshine.com and superhomeworks.com can offer affordable resources and assignment assistance to help individuals gain the necessary skills and knowledge. By empowering young individuals with the means to secure stable employment, society can reduce the incidence of juvenile delinquency significantly.

  1. Community Support and Mentoring Programs

In addition to addressing the lack of educational and employment opportunities, community support and mentoring programs play a vital role in preventing juvenile delinquency. These programs provide a supportive environment for young individuals, offering guidance, positive role models, and opportunities for personal development. By connecting young individuals with mentors who can help them navigate challenges and explore their potential, the risk of delinquent behavior decreases.

Implementing AI-driven mentoring programs can also prove beneficial. AI works can provide personalized guidance and support tailored to the needs of each individual. These programs can offer a safe space for young individuals to discuss their concerns, seek advice, and develop life skills.

Conclusion

Juvenile delinquency resulting from the lack of opportunities is a pressing issue that needs to be addressed. By focusing on providing equitable educational resources, vocational training programs, and community support, society can mitigate the risk factors associated with delinquent behavior. Collaborative efforts from governments, educational institutions, and communities, combined with technological advancements like AI-driven mentoring programs, can help create a brighter future for young individuals, ensuring they have the opportunities necessary to thrive and contribute positively to society.

Save your time - order a paper!

Get your paper written from scratch within the tight deadline. Our service is a reliable solution to all your troubles. Place an order on any task and we will take care of it. You won’t have to worry about the quality and deadlines

ORDER NOW

Key Management Capabilities Required to be an Effective Manager

Key Management Capabilities Required to be an Effective Manager: A Focus on Moana New Zealand and Tauhara North No.2 Trust

Name

Course and Code

Instructor

Date

Introduction

The abilities through which leaders and managers develop, combine, and restructure the firm’s assets and competencies are referred to as management capabilities. Leaders and managers can use these talents to confront their surroundings, enhance the effectiveness of their organizations, and sustain and build competitiveness (Brito & Sauan, 2016). Managers must use their skills to build organizational and strategic procedures that result in more innovation and growth for their companies. Innovation processes necessitate senior management teams using their management skills to correctly assign and disperse the company’s resources and operations. This paper will determine and critically analyse the main management skills needed to be a successful manager in two selected organizations. Two capability frameworks will be used in identifying the critical capabilities for the two organizations. One of the organisations selected are Tauhara North no. 2 trust which is based in Taupo, Waikato, New Zealand. The firm is a financial institution that provides programmes and grants for the whanau in distinct areas of life but particularly, education and health where is really needed. The other organization is Moana New Zealand. The organization is the largest seafood firm that is owned by the Māori. The company manages the economic fisheries resources that Māori were awarded as part of the Treaty of Waitangi Fisheries Settlement with the Crown, the New Zealand government.

Key Management Capabilities Required to be an Effective Manager

In order to highlight the key management capabilities required to be an effective manager, the two capability frameworks is applied. In the first framework, it can be viewed as a flow of causation from left to right. For Moana New Zealand and Tauhara North No.2 Trust, the first framework has the benefit of having a high validity and reliability, that is, it seems rational that proper management will lead to improved individual as well as the organizational performance, and that management abilities might be developed. The premise at the core of the framework is that there is a link between managerial capability and the training and development that managers get, via both formal schooling, such as business education courses, and also more unstructured training and development. The premise on the other end of the framework is that enhanced capacity leads to enhanced individual performance, which translates to improved organizational advantages. For Moana New Zealand and Tauhara North No.2 Trust, this framework defines the behaviour, knowledge and skills that the management, the shareholders, and the employees use to succeed. It provides a common language to allow better communication for Moana New Zealand and Tauhara North No.2 Trust to communicate across various teams.

As a result, the framework includes a variety of indicators that aim to quantify not only ‘managerial skill,’ but also the causes that affect it and the advantages that may result. For example, Moana New Zealand has an environmental structure and management requirements that demand excellence in relations and communications. For Tauhara North No.2 Trust, a deep culture founded on the Maori principles easily allows better communication and shared goals amongst the employees. The set of capabilities that the framework emphasizes are education and qualifications, ongoing training and development, experience and management rules and systems.

In the second framework, it outlines four competence categories, each with a set of characteristics for desired behaviour. Hiring, skill evaluation, and leadership development ought to all be based on these competencies. For Moana New Zealand and Tauhara North No.2 Trust, these competencies are used in conjunction with the appropriate professional development. The emphasis of this framework is on persons in management and leadership roles, an aspect that Moana New Zealand focuses on. The capabilities are created to be applied to all management levels. Some characteristics might be a little more relevant depending on the style of leadership required by the post. The challenges in achieving the capabilities will be shaped by the setting wherein the leader or manager operates. Personal traits, leading change, collaborating with colleagues, and individuals and services management are among the capabilities.

Tauhara North no. 2

In a more specific view of the two capability frameworks, the most important capabilities for Tauhara North no. 2 trust are personal qualities to deal with people since it is a humanitarian organization and experience since experienced managers are undoubtedly the best for organizational management.

Personal Qualities

Companies nowadays place a higher value on personal skills like listening, flexibility, and encouraging open communication. The higher-level features of manager success, including as developing trust, demonstrating compassion, assuming responsibility, and engaging in employee training and development, are enhanced by these personal qualities (Dler & Tawfeq, 2021).  Open communication is a key generator of culture. Workers feel like true partners in the firm when executives communicate honestly and authentically with them – and as a consequence, they feel more engaged. They are also much more inclined to support the organization, even if they do not even concur with all of the choices. Worker engagement rises as a result of this sense of worth. Managers that are good communicators are in high demand. They communicate effectively with their staff and actively listen and comprehend what is truly going on within the company.

Loyalty as well as performance among employees are enhanced by having supervisors that are good listeners who are actually concerned about their employees’ worries. According to past survey, 61% of workers felt that trust between top management and staff was a major factor in job satisfaction. When it comes to what makes a successful manager, promoting a great organizational climate begins with building and retaining trust with the staff. Workers who believe they could trust their boss are more likely to trust manager’s judgments and to be committed to the company’s core mission and aspirations (Kohail et al, 2016). Leaders that fail to cultivate trust risk losing their workers’ respect, which can have a negative impact on productivity, commitment, and eventually employee attrition.

Compassion, a key component of emotional intelligence, necessitates managers making personal connections with their staff. When it comes to shortlisting manager qualities, empathy fosters more than just a healthy employee-management connection; it also has a favourable effect on culture within the workplace. Empathetic supervisors are better at leading people with distinct perspectives to work together successfully.

Experience

Managers, without a doubt, improve their skills and talents in less formal settings than they do via official schooling, training, or development. Learning from job challenges or mentors has been proven in a number of qualitative research to be an important factor in influencing managerial behaviour. Tenure in key roles or experience working in successful organizations could all contribute to such development via experience. Regardless of whether experience is assessed as organizational tenure, length of employment, or years of experience at a specific site, the nature of the connection between experience duration and performance is usually often at times congruent (Azad et al., 2020). Managers with greater organizational tenure may, for example, display a higher level of performance than those with less service. According to prior study, experience on a particular job, rather than generic experience in a subject, experience on relevant past jobs, or experience in work environments, improves workers’ productivity since it allows them to gain job knowledge and abilities.

Human capital theory proponents say that when management teams gain more experience in their early careers, they gain a better understanding of management. For example, managers with more experience understand what it takes one to boost sales and make a profit. Experience is particularly important for managers who have worked on a global scale. Changing one’s perceptions will help the individual become a better boss. Managers enhance their capacity to draw conclusions differently as a result of tapping on multinational experience. Great managers make sense of situations by drawing on their foreign expertise. Great managers utilize their interest and the attitude of being provided with a learning experience when confronted with something they do not even comprehend, and they resist making early judgments or attributing preconceptions to the unfamiliar. Rather, they rely on their cultural understanding and ability for seeing things from a different perspective, which comes from years of experience in the position.

Moana New Zealand

For Moana New Zealand, the best capabilities that the managers ought to have is leading change and training and development as organizations continuously change and it is also vital to develop new skills for managers.

Ongoing training and development

The issue of continual training and development is tightly linked to the first input. This could involve coursework for certifications that, once earned, will be included in data on educational and qualification levels, but it could also encompass far brief durations of training and development (Ruiz-Jiménez & Mar Fuentes-Fuentes, 2016). It would encompass both official, off-the-job training and development as well as casual, on-the-job development.  With the rise of e-learning as well as other innovations that can provide education to the computer in tiny, easily digestible chunks, and the escalating development integration inside the workplace, the latter is becoming increasingly important. It is indeed critical to keep learning and developing new talents, regardless of the level of experience. As one’s career progresses, s/he will need to collaborate effectively with others, gain in – depth industry experience, keep pace with advances in technology, and finally manage everyone else. The core objective of a manager is to be a successful implementer- an individual who organizes people’ activities to achieve company objectives. Managers are responsible for a variety of everyday activities, although their primary goal is getting things accomplished and through people. The capability to coach and guide personnel is a facet of management that is often overlooked. Despite the fact that 78 percent of the population believe having managerial mentors in the workplace is crucial, just 37% of professionals say they have one, implying that extending professional management courses is more vital than ever before.

Almost every business will go through various organizational changes whether planned or unplanned at one point during its tenure. Effective managers must be able to start, respond to, and manage changes within their organizations, whether it is as small role such as recruiting new employees or as huge as an acquisition. Because change is a process rather than an event, managers need to develop abilities in developing, leading, and moulding change processes. By disintegrating the elements of an organizational change process, a managerial program can help one build the abilities required in overseeing a transition. This may also give one the knowledge needed to tackle concerns such as how a firm gets from one point to the next, what activities workers must perform during such organizational transitions, and how to ensure that the activities are carried out.

Leading Change

Globalization has changed the universe into a global village, with an ever-increasing flow of disagreements and rivalry between corporations. As a result, the most productive strategy for any organization is developing new strategies of doing business (Treviño & Cantú, 2020). If the manager is having the necessary competency and capability as a person responsible or as an agent of change, he or she can govern a company or the company transformation process more efficiently and successfully.

Quick technological breakthroughs, high consumer expectations, and the continuously changing conditions of market have driven businesses to regularly analyze and re-assess their operations, as well as to comprehend, accept, and execute transformations in business models in reaction to shifting trends. Change management is a requirement of each day, and it is required for businesses to exist. Organizations in the present era acknowledge the importance of the issue and are constantly working in preparation not only for existing but also for emerging developments in order to achieve long-term progress. However, with all of its repercussions and relevance, the concept of organizational transformation is also a difficult and sophisticated one. According to prior studies, 70% of changes in the organization fail to achieve their objectives (Adachi et al., 2020). Because top management plays such an essential duty in the evolvement and development of a firm, the process of organizational change necessitates the presence of highly efficient and skilled management capable of recognizing the most preferable shape of a firm and addressing the concerns of organizational transformation in the most proper manner.

When it comes to implementing change, the skill of management is the most critical factor to consider. Individuals look to top management for a variety of reasons in a company where they have faith in their abilities (Mutale at al., 2017). Workers will anticipate competent and rational planning, confidence and efficient decision, and timely, thorough communicating during these difficult circumstances. Workers will also regard management as helpful, caring, and dedicated to their well-being during these periods of transition, whilst also understanding that difficult decisions must be made. Between the manager and the rest of the players, there has to be a culture of trust. The presence of this trust instils optimism for a brighter future, which makes dealing with major change much smoother.

Conclusion and Recommendations

All companies exist to fulfil specific goals or objectives, and managers are responsible for combining and utilizing organizational resources to guarantee that their companies meet their goals. Management serves as a watchdog for a collection of employees in the organisation, coordinating their efforts toward a common goal. Management practices, as a recommendation, require ongoing and persistent monitoring, development, and sufficient investment due to its significance. As a result, businesses ought to have a well-thought-out strategic vision that is conveyed to all personnel. It is critical to underline that all workers should be involved in the development and execution of strategic management processes which will equip the firm for the future, provide long-term purpose, and demonstrate the firm’s desire to become a dominant player.

References

Adachi, H., Sekiya, Y., Imamura, K., Watanabe, K., & Kawakami, N. (2020). The effects of

training managers on management competencies to improve their management practices and work engagement of their subordinates: A single group pre-and post-test study. Journal of occupational health, 62(1), e12085. https://dx.doi.org/10.1002%2F1348-9585.12085

Azad, N., Anderson, H. G., Brooks, A., Garza, O., O’Neil, C., Stutz, M. M., & Sobotka, J. L.

(2017). Leadership and management are one and the same. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 81(6). https://dx.doi.org/10.5688%2Fajpe816102

Brito, L. A. L., & Sauan, P. K. (2016). Management practices as capabilities leading to

superior performance. BAR-Brazilian Administration Review, 13. http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1807-7692bar2016160004

Dler, S. M., & Tawfeq, A. O. (2021). Importance of Managerial Roles and Capabilities on

Organizational Effectiveness. http://dx.doi.org/10.6007/IJARBSS/v11-i4/9748

Kohail, Y., Saida, Y., Obad, J., & Soulhi, A. (2016). The Qualities of a Good Manager…

What Does It Mean? Lessons Learned from the Undergraduate Business Students’ Perception in Kingdom of Morocco. International Journal of Business and Management, 11(8), 86-96. http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/ijbm.v11n8p86

Mutale, W., Vardoy-Mutale, A. T., Kachemba, A., Mukendi, R., Clarke, K., & Mulenga, D.

(2017). Leadership and management training as a catalyst to health system strengthening in low-income settings: Evidence from implementation of the Zambia Management and Leadership course for district health managers in Zambia. PLoS One, 12(7), e0174536. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0174536

Olanrewaju, O. I., & Okorie, V. N. (2019). Exploring the qualities of a good leader using

principal component analysis. Journal of Engineering, Project, and Production Management, 9(2), 142. https://DOI 10.2478/jeppm-2019-0016

Ruiz-Jiménez, J. M., & del Mar Fuentes-Fuentes, M. (2016). Management capabilities,

innovation, and gender diversity in the top management team: An empirical analysis in technology-based SMEs. BRQ Business Research Quarterly, 19(2), 107-121. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brq.2015.08.003

Treviño, S. S. G., & Cantú, L. E. Z. (2020). Importance of dynamic managerial capabilities

on the performance of small family businesses. Contaduría y administración, 65(3), 28-56. http://dx.doi.org/10.22201/fca.24488410e.2020.2132

Save your time - order a paper!

Get your paper written from scratch within the tight deadline. Our service is a reliable solution to all your troubles. Place an order on any task and we will take care of it. You won’t have to worry about the quality and deadlines

ORDER NOW

Key Historical Figures in or relating to the Field of Psychology

Key Historical Figures in or relating to the Field of Psychology

Aaron Beck

Abraham Maslow

Albert Bandura

Albert Ellis

Alfred Adler

Alfred BinetAlfred Kinsey

Anna Freud

Aristotle

B.F. Skinner

Carl Jung

Carl Rogers

Carol Gilligan

Charles Darwin

Charles Spearman

Ernest HilgardDavid Wechsler

Diana BaumrindDorothea Dix

Edward Bradford Titchener

Edward Thorndike

Edward TolmanEgas Moniz

Elizabeth Loftus

Erik Erikson

Ernst Heinrich Weber

Franz Anton Mesmer

Franz Gall

G. Stanley Hall

George Miller

Gustav Fechner

Hans Eysenck

Hans SelyeHarry Harlow

Helen Bradford Thompson Woolley

Henry Murray

Herman EbbinghausHerman Rorschach

Howard Gardner

Ivan Pavlov

James Cattell

Jean Piaget

John Berry

John Dewey

John Garcia

John Locke

John Stuart Mill

John Watson

Joseph WolpeKaren Horney

Konrad Lorenz

Lawrence KolbergLeon FestingerLeta S. HollingworthLewis TermanMargaret Floy Washburn

Mary Ainsworth

Mary Cover Jones

Mary Whiton Calkins

Max Wertheimer

Noam Chomsky

Paul BrocaPaul Costa/Robert MccraePhilippe Pinel

Phillip Zimbardo

Phineas Gage

Plato

Rene DecartesRobert Yerkes

Roger Sperry

Rosalie Rayner

Sandra BemSigmund Freud

Sir Francis Galton

Soloman Asch

Stanley Milgram

Stanley SchachterWalter B. Cannon

Wilhelm Wundt

William James

William Stern

Wolfgang Kohler

Save your time - order a paper!

Get your paper written from scratch within the tight deadline. Our service is a reliable solution to all your troubles. Place an order on any task and we will take care of it. You won’t have to worry about the quality and deadlines

ORDER NOW

Key Historical Figures in or relating to the Field of Psychology (3)

Key Historical Figures in or relating to the Field of Psychology

Aaron Beck

Abraham Maslow

Albert Bandura

Albert Ellis

Alfred Adler

Alfred BinetAlfred Kinsey

Anna Freud

Aristotle

B.F. Skinner

Carl Jung

Carl Rogers

Carol Gilligan

Charles Darwin

Charles Spearman

Ernest HilgardDavid Wechsler

Diana BaumrindDorothea Dix

Edward Bradford Titchener

Edward Thorndike

Edward TolmanEgas Moniz

Elizabeth Loftus

Erik Erikson

Ernst Heinrich Weber

Franz Anton Mesmer

Franz Gall

G. Stanley Hall

George Miller

Gustav Fechner

Hans Eysenck

Hans SelyeHarry Harlow

Helen Bradford Thompson Woolley

Henry Murray

Herman EbbinghausHerman Rorschach

Howard Gardner

Ivan Pavlov

James Cattell

Jean Piaget

John Berry

John Dewey

John Garcia

John Locke

John Stuart Mill

John Watson

Joseph WolpeKaren Horney

Konrad Lorenz

Lawrence KolbergLeon FestingerLeta S. HollingworthLewis TermanMargaret Floy Washburn

Mary Ainsworth

Mary Cover Jones

Mary Whiton Calkins

Max Wertheimer

Noam Chomsky

Paul BrocaPaul Costa/Robert MccraePhilippe Pinel

Phillip Zimbardo

Phineas Gage

Plato

Rene DecartesRobert Yerkes

Roger Sperry

Rosalie Rayner

Sandra BemSigmund Freud

Sir Francis Galton

Soloman Asch

Stanley Milgram

Stanley SchachterWalter B. Cannon

Wilhelm Wundt

William James

William Stern

Wolfgang Kohler

Save your time - order a paper!

Get your paper written from scratch within the tight deadline. Our service is a reliable solution to all your troubles. Place an order on any task and we will take care of it. You won’t have to worry about the quality and deadlines

ORDER NOW

Key Historical Figures in or relating to the Field of Psychology (2)

Key Historical Figures in or relating to the Field of Psychology

Aaron Beck

Abraham Maslow

Albert Bandura

Albert Ellis

Alfred Adler

Alfred BinetAlfred Kinsey

Anna Freud

Aristotle

B.F. Skinner

Carl Jung

Carl Rogers

Carol Gilligan

Charles Darwin

Charles Spearman

Ernest HilgardDavid Wechsler

Diana BaumrindDorothea Dix

Edward Bradford Titchener

Edward Thorndike

Edward TolmanEgas Moniz

Elizabeth Loftus

Erik Erikson

Ernst Heinrich Weber

Franz Anton Mesmer

Franz Gall

G. Stanley Hall

George Miller

Gustav Fechner

Hans Eysenck

Hans SelyeHarry Harlow

Helen Bradford Thompson Woolley

Henry Murray

Herman EbbinghausHerman Rorschach

Howard Gardner

Ivan Pavlov

James Cattell

Jean Piaget

John Berry

John Dewey

John Garcia

John Locke

John Stuart Mill

John Watson

Joseph WolpeKaren Horney

Konrad Lorenz

Lawrence KolbergLeon FestingerLeta S. HollingworthLewis TermanMargaret Floy Washburn

Mary Ainsworth

Mary Cover Jones

Mary Whiton Calkins

Max Wertheimer

Noam Chomsky

Paul BrocaPaul Costa/Robert MccraePhilippe Pinel

Phillip Zimbardo

Phineas Gage

Plato

Rene DecartesRobert Yerkes

Roger Sperry

Rosalie Rayner

Sandra BemSigmund Freud

Sir Francis Galton

Soloman Asch

Stanley Milgram

Stanley SchachterWalter B. Cannon

Wilhelm Wundt

William James

William Stern

Wolfgang Kohler

Save your time - order a paper!

Get your paper written from scratch within the tight deadline. Our service is a reliable solution to all your troubles. Place an order on any task and we will take care of it. You won’t have to worry about the quality and deadlines

ORDER NOW

The conditions for success in educational planning

KENYATTA UNIVERSITY (MAIN CAMPUS)

SCHOOL: OF EDUCATION

DEPARTMENT: OF EDUCATION MANAGEMENT, POLICY & CURRICULUM STUDIES

NAME: FRED OWILI OWINO

REG: E55/27782/2014

TASK: cat one;

UNIT: EMP/M/815

UNIT NAME: planning education to meet societal needs

LECTURER: DR KIRANGA GATIMU.

SUBMITTED ON: 17TH /03/2015.

About three decade ago RUSCO, GC wrote a book entitled, “The conditions for success in educational planning.” In what ways would you disagree/agree with a book written more than three decades ago? Give persuasive reasons for your position using examples from Kenya.

Planning is a rational process of preparing a set of decisions for future action. Educational planning is therefore the application of rational and systematic analysis to the process of educational development with the aim of making education more effective and efficient in responding to the needs and goals of individual and society. I would like to disagree with RUSCO, in his book conditions for success in educational planning, in that this book was written long time ago and by now a lot of changes has occurred on educational planning. These conditions stressed may be necessary or sufficient or both in that there may be conditions, no one of which is sufficient to produce the event, but all of which are necessary. There may be a condition sufficient to produce the event, although this condition may not be itself necessary because some other condition(s) may also be sufficient. Finally, there may be a single condition which alone is necessary and sufficient to produce the event.

He first highlights, legal, staffing and technical conditions are as the necessary conditions for successful educational planning. Thus, he finds recurrent concern with the legal bases which define the scope of educational planning and the institutional format for planning; the recruitment, training and deployment of educational planners; and the technical sophistication displayed by planners in collecting, analyzing and using data and in designing and utilizing educational models. Although the specific legal means by which educational planning is initiated and its institutionalized framework established varies somehow from country to country, there has been widespread agreement that educational planning requires a fairly specific legal framework. Such a framework usually includes the legal functions of the planning agency, its relations with other educational authorities and with other planning authorities, and its specific form. He said that the staffing of the planning officers though it was a seasonal variation in the number and kinds of planners employed should proceed relatively well as the government also keeps changing. He therefore concludes on the challenges of planning in regard to financing the whole process. The problem of the recruitment, training and deployment of educational planners, while still not totally resolved, has become increasingly amenable to a pragmatic solution. No longer does the problem seem to be one which requires some prior agreement on the definition of the ‘educational planner’. Rather, most people now agree that a variety of skills are necessary for planning. The need for demographers, statisticians, economists, sociologists and experts in all levels and kinds of education has been agreed upon if not everywhere met. In the last condition RUSCO brings in the element of technical conditions, that Much of the attention given to educational planning has been directed at improving the techniques of planning, ranging from better use of existing statistics to the application of complex models of linkages between education and national development. survey of the legal, staffing and technical conditions conventionally associated with educational planning suggests that such conditions are not sufficient to ensure success in educational planning.

He said that the success in educational planning does not fully depend on only those factors but also must be able to look at the constraints of education planning such as political interference and administrative factors that tries to hinder development in educational planning.

These arguments are rather far much backdated having seen especially greater development in educational planning. That there are a lot of factors to consider in developing strategies to cater for success which are the policy for planning. The first four of which deal with policy making, the fifth with planning and sixth and seventh with policy adjustment:

(i) Analysis of the existing situation.

(ii) The generation of policy options.

(iii) Evaluation of policy options.

(iv) Making the policy decision.

(v) Planning of policy implementation.

(vi) Policy impact assessment.

(vii) Subsequent policy cycles.

In the present state of Kenya a number of policies have been put in place to outlaw the RUSCOS ideas which are majorly outdated, the government in conjunction with UNESCO has brought out clear guidelines in making sure that planning for education is a success. Some of this we see in the millennium goals of education, the constitution of Kenya 2010 and even the UNESCO journal guidelines. That the current situation needs a clear guideline on the seven policies for educational planning. The conceptual framework for policy analysis and its application to the four exemplary cases vividly indicate that education planning cannot be purely technical or linear. It deals with an educational enterprise that is not characterized by unambiguous issues, clearly defined objectives, undisputed causal relationships, predictable rationalities and rational decision-makers. Education policy planning, as such, is by necessity a series of untidy and overlapping episodes in which a variety of people and organizations with diversified perspectives are actively involved in the processes through which issues are analyzed and policies are generated, implemented, assessed and adjusted or redesigned. Education planners thus need a methodological approach, to capture the intricacies of both policies and processes, to give deliberate attention to every element of the policy planning process, and to gauge the evolving dynamics of the system (flow, procedure, form, and interaction among interest groups).A conceptual frame work is sometimes followed to the later in Kenya but then at times most of the decisions made in planning of education are done by the politicians, this interference which always leaves the planners with o decisions but to work out ways of helping implement them.eg the laptop project and the free primary and secondary day school.

COPARE AND CONTRUST the claim by Michal Hopkins that The manpower forecasting debate was carried out vigorously in the 1970s and 1980s but appeared to end with the notion that all forecasting techniques that purported to assess manpower requirements in the future were dubious and that the future lay with labour market analysis and labour market signaling. In general, the monograph disputes the first notion but agrees that the, often over-simplified and non-flexible forecasting models of the past, should be supplemented with better data and improved labour market analysis.

Man power approach method was preferred by economists in the 1950s and 1960s Based on the argument that Economic growth is the mainspring of a nation’s overall development -thus should be the prime consideration in allocating scarce resources. Economic growth requires not only physical resources but also human resources to organize and use them.The focus of this approach is to forecast the manpower needs of the economy. It stresses on output from the educational system to meet the man-power needs at some future date. Manpower planning is based on the attempt to forecast the future demand for educated manpower Given the length of time taken to produce educated professional people, such forecasts may have to be made for some years e.g. fifteen years in the case of scientists, engineers, or medical doctors. There was a dubious discussion between 1970s and 1980s which was very vigorous, the findings shifted goals to labour market analysis. That manpower approach gives educational planner a limited guidance on what can actually be achieved in every level of education e.g. primary education, secondary education, etc. The approach says nothing about primary education, which is not considered to be work connected. It suggests the curbing of the expansion of primary education until the nation is rich enough to expand it. It focuses more attention on the cream of education that will contribute to manpower development in the society. It focuses on manpower needs mostly in the urban employment. It does not focus on semi-skilled and unskilled workers in the cities and vast majority of workers that live in rural areas. (Over production of engineers’ vs. masons).It relies on employment classifications and manpower ratios such engineers to technicians; doctors to nurses etc from industrialized countries or economy. This does not fit into the realities of less developed countries of Africa. It is therefore impossible to make reliable fore-cast of manpower requirements far enough ahead of time because of economic, technological, political and other uncertainties which may occur. This Approach has largely been applied at the level of persons with higher education and has tended to ignore those with lower levels of education, i.e. the great majority of workers; Limits itself to headcounts and ignores the effects of movements in wages and other prices; largely makes use of employment data relating to the public sector and/or to large private firms, whereas in developing countries the majority of workers are liable to be in small firms and/or in the informal sector; It is based on the historical relationship between output and labour, which is then extrapolated forward decades ahead; It is gender insensitive Man-power & women power

Labour market analysis is an approach/methodology that presents a major shift from the manpower planning approach.  Manpower planning focuses on skilled and formal labour only and is gender biased (woman power, manpower),

Labour market analysis categorizes labour employed and unemployed, skilled, semi-skilled and unskilled, formal and informal, male and female. The basis of policy analysis lies in the recognition of the inability of human beings to anticipate future developments accurately. E.g. the conceptual problems in the manpower approach it that it implies that the main purpose of education is employment. But education encompasses a wider perspective of producing a human person who would be able to play a meaningful role in society. The labour market is a generalized concept representing the interaction between:

the supply (number of persons available for work) &

the demand (number of jobs available) and

the wage rate effects of education/output, outcome

The keyword “planning” is out “policy” and “analysis” has become keywords. Policy has more modest, short-term affectation than planning. Labour market analysts constantly adjust short and medium term analyses to reflect changing conditions while keeping the long-term in mind. The horizon of the manpower planner is long, sometimes as long as twenty years. The labor market analyst has a much shorter horizon.  Manpower planning makes unrealistic estimates/forecasts. It is difficult to make reliable forecasts of manpower requirements for a long period of time.

Society is dynamic and political, economic, social and technological changes can take place any time. A significant focus of labor market analyses is the concern for poverty and equity rather than strictly production efficiency. (How much you produce given certain inputs)

In labour market analysis efficiency is no longer the only criterion of social action rather equity and poverty considerations are taken into account. It is therefore concerned with correcting present imbalances in the labor market and in reassessing the situation periodically in order to take additional corrective action as necessary. Hence Michal Hopkins that the manpower forecasting debate was carried out vigorously in the 1970s and the 1980s, making the labour market analysis most suitable approach to use. The manpower planning school stresses labour market research and labour market

Signaling as ‘the’ alternative to manpower forecasting. There is no objection to the need for alternative techniques but, as also argued, there is a need to perform, and perfect, forecasting to provide a future vision to assist in the assessment of training and educational needs. The labour market signaling chapter showed that even with relatively detailed surveys, the identification of mismatches on the labour market and future training needs is not straightforward. The data collected in the surveys would help to calibrate some.

Reference

Caillods, F. 1991. Educational planning for the year 2000. IIEP Contributions No. 4. Paris: UNESCO/International Institute for Educational Planning.

G. C. Ruscoe 1969.The Conditions for Success in Educational Planning. UNESCO: International Institute for Educational Planning

Hallak, J. 1991. Educational planning: reflecting on the past and its prospects for the future. IEP Contributions No. 2. Paris: UNESCO/International Institute for Educational Planning.

LYONS, R. F. (ed.). Problems and strategies of educational planning: lessons from Latin America. Paris, Unesco/IIEP, 1965, 117 p., tables.

Save your time - order a paper!

Get your paper written from scratch within the tight deadline. Our service is a reliable solution to all your troubles. Place an order on any task and we will take care of it. You won’t have to worry about the quality and deadlines

ORDER NOW

Kenyan diaspora within the US

Kenyan diaspora within the US

Student’s Name

Institutional Affiliation

Course Number and Name

Instructor Name

Due Date

Kenyan diaspora within the US

Many different people go to different countries for a certain reason. Some people travel with their families while others travel solo. Some travel for short periods while others relocate completely to other countries. Every person always has a reason for relocation or travel. Sometimes it might be education, treatment, jobs among other issues. Most of the time the people from the developing countries travel to the already developed countries looking for greener pastures and these land them in countries in the west. The United States is one of the countries which have a unique combination of the population regarding their origin. The blacks and the whites even though not on the same level are very much present in the United States alongside other ethnic groups and races like Asians and Latinos. My focus in this paper is the Kenyan citizens who live in the United States, the reasons for relocation and I will focus majorly on my friend Mark who is a child to a Kenyan family who relocated to the United States from Kenya.

I got to know Mark during my senior years and we have grown to be friends who support each other in so many different ways. The story about his family is a special one as well as an interesting one. The daymark came to school he was not talkative and as most people assume, we thought that he was a black American who did not like talking to most other people because he did not want to be asked questions or anything to do with racism (Cohen, 2008). Therefore with my curiosity, I approached him one day and he told me that he is Kenyan and he was new to the United States, the language, the environment, and everything. From then on I decided to help him as much as I could and right now he is enjoying his stay here. Along the way, I got to learn so much about Kenya and I am already planning to visit the country in one of the holidays.

The first challenge was with the American English accent which he got to understand within a very short time. However, this was a bit complex because even in the United States there are different varieties of English apart from the standard one. However, with the help of research, I helped him. Within two weeks he was completely conversant with the American accent and he could talk to anyone fluently. He had an English origin in Kenya whereby English is the national language even though it is British English and not American English (Ssewanyana et al, 2018). After the basic introductions and showing him around he was ready to talk about the deep-seated issues within him which made his parents relocate to the United States. They included jobs and the desire for better living standards.

His father was already here working and studying as a neurosurgeon before the rest of the family came to the United States. After his father finished his doctor of philosophy in neurosurgery he requested the family to come to the United States so that they may live together. It was one decision that was very difficult for the family to make since the mother to Mark; Sophia was taking care of the grandmother to Mark. It was even a difficult decision to make since they had just begun large-scale farming under irrigation and they had a 6 bedroom house under construction. The father to Mark wanted them to celebrate together as he got the highest possible education certificate in the medical field and specifically neurosurgery. Upon this desire and request, Sophia Marks mother called for a family meeting and they had to discuss the issue so that everything was left in good hands. It was not the desire of everyone that they should leave. However, Sophia was very much interested in traveling to the USA to be with her husband.

When the grandmother to Mark began to talk he stated that it was very important for the activities which were ongoing to continue and that after the activities had to be done then traveling to the United States could be arranged. This made Sophia a bit uncomfortable but weighing the situation that was ahead of her she needed to consider what was more important than just traveling to the United States to be with her husband. At that time Mark was in form four the equivalent of k12 school system the four junior year’s high school. Therefore he went back to school knowing that sometime after his junior high school he would join the k12 school system as a senior in the United States. He outdid himself and he performed excellently. His mother and grandmother were left discussing how the 10 acres of land under irrigation were to be managed when they left and how the construction could be done fast enough to make sure it was done before they left.

From the day Marks father requested them to come to the United States it took about six months preparing for the journey so that everything could be done properly and also because it was for a long period. Sophia was a teacher who had just graduated with a master’s in educational planning and administration and that was her third degree as she had also done computer science. She was not practicing any of her learned careers since she was much focused on her family as she had a little kid and a family to manage.

After Mark closed schools they discussed the matter of traveling to the United States in a more versed manner than they had done before. The issues which came to the table were the reasons for relocating and they included better living standards and salaries, a high number of black Americans, and the reduced rate of racism. However, Mark kept thinking about his friends and he never even at one point imagined leaving Kenya for another country. He only imagined himself coming to the United States for holidays and not to stay here. He was a bit disturbed but hoped everything was to work well.

However, as Mark has stayed in the United States for more than 2 years now he has affirmed that the living standards here are better than in his original country Kenya. He has also affirmed that racism is not as much as it was before and that he can openly buy or walk into any place without having to worry about being bullied because he is black. Even though there are a few instances of being uncomfortable when dealing with white people some of them still believe it is okay to have black people below the whites. He made a joke as I was interviewing him and stated that if a white person tries to belittle him he just asks them if they know what his father or mother could do to him then he tells them to take care.

Even though the cost of living in the United States is higher than in Kenya the jobs are well paying especially for people who are seasoned in their careers like his mother and father. Therefore he states that with the better-paying jobs he is hoping to stay and look for a job here instead of going back home when he is done with school (Copeland-Carson, 2007). The high number of black Americans and African Americans also excites him and he is very fond of being around black people as he says that it brings him some kind of peace. Therefore he hopes that he is not racist but a neutral person who tries to belong to his kind of people.

When I asked him about the quality of life here he had different answers. First of all, he looked at the perspective of having an easy life where a person could get anything at the touch of a button. He said that in Kenya that was also very possible in the capital city which is Nairobi but in the rural areas it was not possible and therefore he had to take her mother’s car if her mother needed something and drive for about 3 miles before they could get a large quantity of what they wanted. However, he stated that life was enjoyable then because as he traveled he could interact with his friends, and even at times when what was needed was not that bulky he went with a bike (Kinuthia, & Akinyoade, 2012). Therefore he describes the United States as boring when it comes to interaction as almost everyone is on their phone and trying to order something.

He also stated that in Kenya the rate of pollution was very low as compared to the United States. First of all, he told me something which I never thought was true. He stated that Kenya had banned plastic bags and if a person was seen in public using plastic bags he could be fined. Therefore pollution was low. With the less levels of industrialization as well Kenyans were less likely to experience excessive air pollution as it is in the United States. He also stated that there was some peace he cannot find in the United States especially in the Kenyan rural areas. Nature was at its best and he could even go to the river and just stay at the bank and admire the environment around him a thing which he could not practice in the United States. Wildlife was also in large numbers in Kenya n parks and the united stated they are limited. The climate was also different and the level of joblessness was low.

In conclusion, the experiences of Mark and the interview about his stay in the United States of America left me with a better and brother view of Kenya and therefore I am more informed. His stay in the United States so far has been good and he hopes to go back to Kenya to have a good time with his grandma.

References

Cohen, R. (2008). Global diasporas: An introduction. Routledge.Copeland-Carson, J. (2007). Kenyan diaspora philanthropy: Key practices, trends, and issues. Unpublished paper prepared for the Philanthropy Initiative, Inc., and The Global Equity Initiative, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.

Kinuthia, B. K., & Akinyoade, A. (2012). Diaspora and development in Kenya: what do we know?. Migration Policy Practice, 2(2), 16-20.

Ssewanyana, D., Abubakar, A., Van Baar, A., Mwangala, P. N., & Newton, C. R. (2018). Perspectives on underlying factors for an unhealthy diet and sedentary lifestyle of adolescents at a Kenyan coastal setting. Frontiers in public health, 6, 11.

Save your time - order a paper!

Get your paper written from scratch within the tight deadline. Our service is a reliable solution to all your troubles. Place an order on any task and we will take care of it. You won’t have to worry about the quality and deadlines

ORDER NOW

Kenyan diaspora within the US (2)

Kenyan diaspora within the US

Student’s Name

Institutional Affiliation

Course Number and Name

Instructor Name

Due Date

Diaspora in Kenya

Introduction

Reason for travelling to united states

Brief summary of the paper

Thesis statement

Reason for travelling to united and not any other developed country

Living standards

Reduced racism

Better paying jobs

High number of Kenyans already there

High number of African American individuals already present in the country

Argument

Comparison of developing countries (Kenya) and super power countries (united states)

Quality of life

Peace

Pollution

Infrastructure

Center of analysis

My interaction with different Kenyans

Their experiences

How they viewed The US before coming here

How their lives changed upon travelling to the united states

Life in Kenya from their experiences

Joblessness

Corruption

Wildlife

References

Cohen, R. (2008). Global diasporas: An introduction. Routledge.

Copeland-Carson, J. (2007). Kenyan diaspora philanthropy: Key practices, trends and issues. Unpublished paper prepared for the Philanthropy Initiative, Inc., and The Global Equity Initiative, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.

Kinuthia, B. K., & Akinyoade, A. (2012). Diaspora and development in Kenya: what do we know?. Migration Policy Practice, 2(2), 16-20.

Otiso, K. (2009). Kenya in the crosshairs of global terrorism: fighting terrorism at the periphery. Kenya Studies Review, 1(1), 107-132.

Ssewanyana, D., Abubakar, A., Van Baar, A., Mwangala, P. N., & Newton, C. R. (2018). Perspectives on underlying factors for unhealthy diet and sedentary lifestyle of adolescents at a Kenyan coastal setting. Frontiers in public health, 6, 11.

Thomas, D. B. (1992). The place of the European in Kenya society. Wajibu, 7(3), 10-11.

Zeleza, P. T. (2010). African diasporas: toward a global history. African studies review, 53(1), 1-19.

Save your time - order a paper!

Get your paper written from scratch within the tight deadline. Our service is a reliable solution to all your troubles. Place an order on any task and we will take care of it. You won’t have to worry about the quality and deadlines

ORDER NOW